Rating System

Adaptive Trail Rating Chart


Summary:


Adaptive Level 1: Paved. Wide trail, recreation path, or road. Flat or mild steepness, no off-camber sections. No obstacles.


Adaptive Level 2: Hardpack surface. Wide trail, recreation path, or road. Flat or mild steepness, no off-camber sections. No obstacles.


Adaptive Level 3: Hardpack surface. Wide trail, recreation path, or road. Flat to moderate steepness, flat to moderate off-camber sections. No obstacles.


Adaptive Level 4: Mostly hardpack, minimal loose sections. Wide trail or maintained fire road. Slopes and off-camber sections may be steep. Mild obstacles likely.


Adaptive Level 5: Wide trail or fire road. Steepness and off-camber sections can be difficult. Terrain may have loose sections with minimal hardpack. Obstacles likely, but more than one line often possible.


Adaptive Level 6: Narrow trail, hardpack with mild steepness, no off-camber sections, no obstacles.


Adaptive Level 7: Narrow trail, mostly hardpack with minimal loose sections, mild to moderate steepness, mild off-camber sections, fixed obstacles likely.


Adaptive Level 8: Narrow trail, mostly hardpack with some loose sections, mild to moderate steepness, mild to moderate off-camber sections, fixed and/or loose obstacles likely.


Adaptive Level 9: Narrow trail, mixed terrain of hardpack and loose sections. Steepness and off-camber sections can be difficult. Obstacles will be somewhat technical.


Adaptive Level 10: Narrow trail, mixed terrain of hardpack and loose sections. Steepness and off-camber sections can be difficult. Lots of technical obstacles and tight routes. High rollover risk.

  1. Ret MSgt Bruce Cooper March 19, 2017 at 1:52 am

    I like this system. I am just getting back into cycling. I was injured in Afghanistan, and can no longer ride much on a diamond frame bike. I am riding a Bacchetta Giro 20 and am using it on single track as well as road. I am in the treasure valley of Idaho, and am looking for trails around boise I can ride with my wife. She likes the hard stuff and climbing, so I am trying harder stuff for her, and she is going on easier stuff for me. This Rating system seems like a good understandable system that I can convert for my type of riding. I would love to see this on out MTB trails around here. Thank you for what you are doing. I may be converting to a tadpole soon via the Va.

    Reply

    1. Thanks for the note, Bruce. It’s awesome that you’re getting back out there. Do you know Pat Dougherty by any chance? He lives in Boise and rides an offroad handcycle.

      Reply

      1. Scott, I just got this message, I do not know Pat at this point, any Ideas as to how I might reach out to him?

        Reply

        1. Hey Bruce, I just sent you an email.

          Reply

    2. Jet Turner

      The Red Cliffs review Pat wrote is in the Boise foothills.
      HG out of Ketchum ID. has three off-road program trikes. Two handcycles and one leg powered bike from ReActive Adaptations.
      Last year we were riding Saturday mornings. If you are interested, let me know and I can get you contact information.
      We can always fit in new riders!

      Reply

      1. Jet, I hope to make it to Ketchum this late spring or summer. By then I should have my Trike. I am hoping to get the Catrike road set up with 26″ rear and 24″ front tires. Does this sound like a tadpole that will work on the adaptive trails? I was also thinking maybe I should get a Schlumph mountain drive, any thoughts?

        Reply

  2. Jet Turner

    Hi Bruce, We still have a lot of snow on our trails. May be a few weeks yet.
    The Tadpole will probably work fine on some of the milder trails.
    I’m sure you can borrow Higher Ground of Sun Valley’s ReActive Adaptations Stinger program bike for a day.
    http://www.reactiveadaptations.com/stinger-offroad-recumbent-bicycle/
    A Schlumph might not hurt especially if you only have large chain rings. Let me know if you want a biking partner.

    Reply

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